Invoice Factoring

By: Max Bellamy

Factoring is selling invoices to receive your money at the moment, instead of waiting for say, two to three months. That's why it is one of the most important finance management tools - especially for a small company that does not create debt. Factoring does not require you to give up any ownership in your company.

For carrying out any operation, finance is required. So, necessary finance is to be raised, allocated and controlled for the effective execution of any function. Success or failure of the firm as such depends on how effectively the finance part is undertaken.

The finance function is comprised of the determining and raising of necessary funds from appropriate sources and their proper allocation and control. The aim is to attain the enterprise objective of wealth maximization. The wealth or the value of the firm is at the maximum when the return or profit is also at the maximum. But with the increase in return the risk also increases. For example, holding less inventory may increase profit because a lesser amount is locked up in inventory, but this may increase the risk as the chance of running out of inventory is higher.

According to experts, factoring process has some distinct advantages. For example, unlike a loan, collateral is not required in the factoring process, there is no interest, and no debt shows up on your balance sheet. What's more, fees are paid in the form of a percentage discount, deducted after all of the invoices have been paid to the Factor. The discount amount depends on the length of time it takes to collect on the invoices.

Always keep capital budgeting and working capital on mind while understanding the finance management. Capital budgeting is the evaluation and ranking of investment projects with the aim of finding out the most suitable project from among alternative courses. On the other hand, working capital is the amount of capital required for the day-to-day running of the enterprise.

Accounting
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