Onwards the Future: the Volvo Window Motor

By: amanda nealy

Elegance and luxury in automobiles perhaps became more prevalent in the late 1940's. Most executive cars at that period started to feature major "firsts" in automobile manufacture. These innovations became so popular that soon they became a standard in luxury vehicles.

The power window is perhaps the first significant technological change in automobiles. Its primary function is to provide comfort and ease by taking out the task of winding the window handle. This was a very efficient innovation as primitive window knobs often rust and get stuck. People were delighted to find out that windows can easily be operated by just pushing a button. Also, it provides adequate safety because the windows cannot be forced open.

This is how the power windows work. Found at the very core of the power windows system is the lifting mechanism. The lift is provided by the window motor attached to a worm gear and several spur gears. A larger gear reduction is created, giving it enough torque to lift the glass window. The basic system process is quite intricate. Power is fed to the driver's door through a circuit breaker. The power comes out into the window-switch control panel on the door and is distributed to a contact center of each of the four window. Power, however, is only derived from one source. The window motor is considered to be the heart of the system. It primarily disperses electricity to the wirings much like as a heart pumps blood to the veins. Most car manufacturers specifically see to it that their window motors provide the maximum performance.

Volvo is a leading manufacturer that produces the best automobiles with power windows. Their engineering includes the highly regarded Volvo window motor that provides the most efficient flow of electricity. This specific part gave Volvo countless global awards and recognitions. Volvo's luxury fleet are equipped with Volvo window motors that give their power windows a more systematic mechanism.

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