Games for Your Valentine Party

By: rhusain
Do you want to find out who is the prettiest, cleverest and funniest among your party gang, then try the following game and get the answer and prove your Valentine party to be the best.

Supper over, the envelopes were opened. Each contained red heart stickers, narrow strips of colored paper, figures of Cupid and various other bits which Sally had cut from old valentines. This little store of supplies was supplemented by sheets of red and white construction paper, a box of crayons, a jar of library paste, and scissors. Each guest was requested to make a valentine, from her supply, for a boy friend. Any style was permissible; pretty, fancy, or the old-style comic. This valentine-making was conducive to much jesting, commotion and comparing of notes. Rhymesters added clever verses while others printed their messages in prose. Prizes were awarded for the prettiest, the cleverest, and the funniest. The finished valentines were displayed on the mantel.

Next Sally asked each guest to write an adjective on the back of the envelope which bore her name. She collected the envelopes and then read a valentine romance which she had prepared beforehand using her guests as characters in the story. As she came to each name she preceded it by the adjective selected by that unsuspecting guest.

For instance in the story " Mary Brown went walking one day and whom should she see but Helen Grayson." Filling in the blanks with the adjectives each guest herself had chosen the story reads: "Vicious Mary Brown went walking one day and whom should she see but gangling Helen Grayson." This game was particularly funny because much of the time the unwitting guest had chosen an adjective most inappropriate; the fat guest choosing "skinny" and the like.

The next game was played on the dining-room table, which in the meantime was cleared for action. Each of six small dime store blocks bore on each of its six faces, one of the letters H, E, A, R, T, S. The players took turns in rolling all the cubes at one throw. Each player kept her own score, giving herself one point for each word that could be made from the letters that came up. No letter could be used more than once, but it wasn't necessary to use all the letters each time. For example, when HAASET came up, the thrower received nine points because she could make the nine words, "as," "tea," "hat," "sat," "set," "has," "heat," "the," and "ash." Ten points were scored if "hearts" could be spelled.

The result of the next game was surprising. This party included only a group who were very well acquainted. Each guest was given four cards; a blue, a gray, a green, and a brown. On the blue card each was asked to write the names of all the blue-eyed persons present; list the brown-eyed on the brown card; the gray-eyed on the gray; and the green-eyed on the green. The girls were very much chagrined to find that so many of them did not know the color of their friends' eyes.

This precipitated a lot of joshing as to each other's lack of observation. As the party broke up, the girls congratulated Sally on her many original party ideas.

This game is very fun to be played among the friends. By the end of the game they will realize how well they know their friends.
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