The Best Way To Stop Smoking

By: sayush
There really is no best way to stop smoking. The only "best way" is for the smoker to say, "I really, really want to quit smoking" and actually mean it. The twp main things every one else can offer is support and advice. As a smoker, be clear about why you want to quit when you listen to their advice and support, listing as many reasons as you can, and then making a plan to accomplish your goal. On the list of why you want to quit, try to include achieving better health and fitness, wanting to live longer, less risk of cancer and heart disease, no nicotine stained fingers or teeth, better smelling breath, healthier babies and setting examples for the family, healthier skin with fewer wrinkles, increased budget income, etc.

We need to prepare ourselves mentally by setting an actual date we are going to quit. Make it a special day, a day of personal achievement - it can be our birthday or anniversary; a holiday or one of our children's birthdays; and can also be on No Smoking Day, the second Wednesday of every March. It really does not matter, as long as it means something to us. Reducing our smoking without setting a date to quit may not work, because our smoking is likely to increase once again. Be aware of the fact that it is easy to give in to temptation and start smoking again, especially when we are tense and upset. We stand to lose all that we have gained, if we have one single cigarette. And then we will have to start all over again.

Making a plan is easy - sticking to it is something else. If we were serious about wanting to quit smoking, we would follow it to the "T" - and hope to achieve our goal, by knowing what to expect and preparing ourselves to face the withdrawal symptoms. Most people find the first few days as the most difficult, with things becoming better after the first three or four days. Nicotine withdrawal symptoms may include irritation, restlessness, frustration, sleeplessness, and being "fumbly stumbly" accident-prone.

To curb these withdrawals and ease the distress, use NRT, or nicotine replacement therapy, in the form of gum, patches, lozenges, inhalers, etc. that can double our chances of success, by reducing the intensity of our cravings. Go to counseling and behavior therapy classes. Use Nicotinell, Nicorette and NiQuitin CQ as some of the nicotine product aids. Another option is to use the drug Zyban, which is available on prescription. All of these aids are available.

Regardless which NRT method we use, we need to find something to do and stay as busy as possible, to take the place of smoking. Games, woodwork, online surveys, taking extra adult classes, volunteering at literary workshops, etc. We can drink a lot of water, tea, or juice, or chew gum. Whatever we enjoy doing should be approached at this time. Try to stay busy doing what we like. To avoid weight gain that usually accompanies quitting smoking, try not to grab food instead of a cigarette, and if you do - change your diet by grabbing raw vegetables and lots of fruit, drink lots of juices and water, avoid alcohol, and exercise much more.

Avoid situations where we may be tempted to smoke such as bars, nightclubs, hotels, and certain eating establishments. All of this is common sense, but when we are in the withdrawal mode, we do not think, we react only to the pain and distress our body is going through. Care for it gently, by compensating these feelings with something health and pleasurable. Family and friends will support you to deal with nicotine withdrawal symptoms if you let them.
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