Fitness for Health and Wellbeing

By: ann777
When you think of fitness, you may be thinking of well-toned bodies, rock-hard abs and generally, just a fit and outstanding physique. What if I told you that in order to be truly fit and feel great you don’t need to be a body builder?

Fitness is more than exercise. If you think exercise and weight control are all there is to fitness, you may be surprised! Fitness is a lifelong pursuit, not a short term goal. "Physical fitness is defined as "a set of attributes that people have or achieve that relates to the ability to perform physical activity" (USDHHS, 1996).

In fact, physical fitness is made up of five main components: cardio-respiratory endurance, muscular strength, muscular endurance, body composition and flexibility.

An interesting quote I came across is this: "The biggest obstacle people face in achieving physical and financial fitness is developing consistent and long-term healthy habits." This came from Countrywide Bank Managing Director, Pierre Habis. Interestingly, it points up the fact that anything worth achieving should become a mindset based on a long term goal. Add anything that is worth while achieving to your regular life routine.

In general, physical fitness is the ability to do daily activities without feeling overly tired. Physical fitness is especially beneficial in preventing coronary heart disease and cardiovascular disease, enhancing muscle quality, preventing muscular deterioration and reducing depression.

You see, true fitness is everything from proper sleep to proper nutrition, from stress reduction to weight reduction, and from flexibility to balance to relaxation. Being physically well toned and muscular does not mean you’re healthy.

Diet and exercise work together for your body's best interest. That’s because nutrition and physical activity go together like bread and butter for our bodies. Dieting alone is not going to be able to give you all of these health benefits. You need to have the physical part as well. Exercise will aid in digestion, provide strength and endurance, and does wonders for the heart.

On the flip side, it is important to be aware of the fact that a bad diet can affect your fitness training, even if you follow the best type of exercise plan available! In order to stay as healthy as possible, you need to combine a healthy diet with a lot of exercise!

The average person needs at least twenty minutes of exercise three times a week. This is not hard for most people to attain – even if you’re not used to any kind of fitness training. It will help to strengthen your cardiovascular health and your overall fitness. Regardless of what sort of physical activity you choose, you should burn about 3500 calories per week. You will soon start feeling the benefits!

When you start any type fitness plan it is recommended that you talk
to your doctor about it first. He may work out a specific exercise plan with you that is best suited for your particular physical needs. Be sure to discuss with your doctor any special health concerns like blood pressure, hypertension and any special diet needs that you may have.

It just cannot be stressed enough how the combination of a healthy diet and exercise plan will do wonders for your overall well being. It will make you feel good mentally, emotionally, as well as physically!

Did you know that you can use diet to control high blood pressure? Studies have shown that exercise has a role in keeping blood pressure from increasing. Yes; hypertension can be controlled by physical activity, a low fat diet, and reducing your salt intake, weight, and alcohol consumption!

There is also increasing evidence that weight bearing exercises, like walking, dancing, running, and sports are all excellent for good bone health.

To balance your overall health, you need to have a healthy diet that provides ample calcium, vitamins and minerals along with the adequate amount of exercise to keep your body working great for the rest of your life.










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