Israel Trips - the Dripstones Cave - Fossils of Water

By: Yoram Raz

One of the friendliest courses for a first degree science student, is introduction to geology - and what is this course with out a trip to a dripstones cave?

In order not to make our readers fall asleep, we won't explain the chemistry aspect of the creation of the dripstones, stalagmites, ears and much more other amazing art works.

We will only point the fact, that in former years, it was forbidden to take photos in the cave, fearing the flashes encourage the growth of alga on the dripstones, but studies show that actually, flashes destroy the alga since it contains a little bit of ultra violet light.

The excuse for forbidding taking photos deep down the cave is now the fact that the photographers interfere the tours and dazzle others with their flashes.

Notice that on Fridays, during low tourist traffic, the dripstone cave is open to photographers.

Quickly, we found an available Friday, took our tripods (whoever thinks he could take photos in total dark without a tripod, probably has metal solid hands...) and put our cameras on night scene state. An easy drive across Beit-Shemesh on road number 3866 got us to the cave.

Going down to the cave is arranged by stairs and funny signs which were placed by the Israely nature and parks authority.

The blooming of the season around us, added some color to the environment. Easily, we got to the entrance of the cave site, equipped with a ticket which dismissed us from paying the entrance fee. After entering we started taking photos.

The moist air under the ground covered our lenses with soft vapor, which forced us to remove it once in a while. the low lighting forced taking photos on tripods, with long exposure time, but the results justify the travel and seals another photogenic and nice day trip

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