Fast Loans: Loans in a Jiffy

By: Bernard Ethen

Unsecured fast loans cater to a vast clientele. Homeowners, tenants, self-employed, students, aging citizens are all part of the vast customer base that this loan enjoys. The maximum limit that can be borrowed by the loan seeker includes ?25,000. As there is no other parameters through which the lender can judge the borrowers financial stability, his credit score becomes the most valuable measuring tool.

A borrower is supposed to be a good client if he has none of these mentioned in his credit record:

ï‚?CCJs (County Court Judgements)
ï‚?Arrears
ï‚?Bankruptcy
ï‚?Defaults
ï‚?Missed payments

Lenders take each case and after a thorough scan of the application. Lenders send each form to credit bureaus for a credit check. Only after a clearance from them does the application get processed ahead. Every lender will have different criteria for selecting or rejecting an application. Generally, a credit score above 700 is considered as a good score.

The repayment period for unsecured fast loans can start from 12 months to 10 years. Most borrowers make a mistake of defaulting or missing repayments. There is a common misunderstanding that borrowers can get away with any penalty. However, that is not the case. Lenders can take you to court in the event of failure in clearing credit statements.

If you are a homeowner, the unsecured fast loans deal will be converted into a secured loan deal. In case of working tenants, employers will be asked to deduct the money directly from the monthly salary. People who are acting as guarantors for students, in most cases their parents will have to pay up for the loan amount.

The most visible effect that defaults and missed payments can have is on your credit score. Once you get a bad credit score, it is a bit difficult to get loans. Of course, the loan market is such that they have created a special loan product for bad credit holders, but, the interest rate associated with it will be high.

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