General Information About The Last Will and Testament

By: David Fagan
A will is a legal document that helps you to protect your assets and minimize any dispute over the distribution of your estate when you pass on. When created properly, a will is a tool that will control the distribution of your property upon your death. Also, you can use a last will and testament to appoint a guardian over your minor child(ren) in the event you pass on. You can also name the person who will manage your estate after you die, to help properly execute the will and distribute the property to the appropriate beneficiaries as directed. If any of these issues are important to you then you should think about creating a last will and testament.When you have created a will, your assets are distributed to your beneficiaries through an order of the probate court.

The executor, which you name in your will, gathers up the assets and provides an inventory of it to the probate court. The executor is then responsible for overseeing the testator's (person who made the will) assets while distributing them according to the specific requests in the will.To make a valid will the person who made the will must have been at least 18 years old or more and must have signed the document in the presence of two witnesses. For the will to be valid the testator (person making the will) must sign the document in front of two witnesses, and the signature must be notarized in the presence of those same two witnesses.A lot of people get confused between a Trust and a Last Will and Testament. A Trust details how property is held, transferredFind Article, or owned before the death of the person who made the trust. If a Trust is the legal owner of the transferred property and the testator dies then the transferred property doesn't have to go through Probate court. This is because a Trust doesn't give directive to your wishes over your assets after your death like a last will does.

Estate Planning
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